"So we beat on, boats against the current"

M. here - sorta like Kafka's K., but hopefully a little funnier. I'm currently working on an M.A. in Literature, continuing my work in academia as a scholar on Philip Roth, Woody Allen, Ingmar Bergman and Mad Men.
vintageanchorbooks:

Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley
"Nothing makes you think about death quite like a birthday. For no writer is this a more appropriate paradox than for Mary Shelley, who was born on August 30th, 1797. Shelley’s most famous work, the reason why we remember her birth 217 years after it occurred, is Frankenstein, which tells the story of a young doctor who creates a living being out of dead body parts, leading to much sorrow.”
Read more on Biographile…

vintageanchorbooks:

Happy Birthday, Mary Shelley

"Nothing makes you think about death quite like a birthday. For no writer is this a more appropriate paradox than for Mary Shelley, who was born on August 30th, 1797. Shelley’s most famous work, the reason why we remember her birth 217 years after it occurred, is Frankenstein, which tells the story of a young doctor who creates a living being out of dead body parts, leading to much sorrow.”

Read more on Biographile…

slaughterhouse90210:

“When there is pleasure, there is often abandon, and mistakes are made.”— Dave Eggers, What Is the What

slaughterhouse90210:

“When there is pleasure, there is often abandon, and mistakes are made.”
— Dave Eggers, What Is the What


“I am incredibly passionate about my life, I am absolutely unable to hide any emotion. If I wrote a book, I’d have to call it ‘P is for Passion’. I don’t go in for anything halfway. My feelings about things are instant, on the spot. And my heart is always, always on my sleeve.” - Kate Winslet

“I am incredibly passionate about my life, I am absolutely unable to hide any emotion. If I wrote a book, I’d have to call it ‘P is for Passion’. I don’t go in for anything halfway. My feelings about things are instant, on the spot. And my heart is always, always on my sleeve.” - Kate Winslet

(Source: katewinsletsource, via juliakip)

cinephiliabeyond:

Writing with Light: Vittorio Storaro (1992) — a marvelous documentary about legendary cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, one of history’s ten most influential cinematographers (Apocalypse Now, The Last Emperor, Reds, Il Confimista, 1900). Vittorio Storaro talks about his work, along with collaborators like Warren Beatty and Bernardo Bertolucci and peers like Nestor Almendros. On-set footage from Dick Tracy and The Sheltering Sky. Storaro explains his zany theories about light and colour, and gives a potted history of lighting in the cinema.


A cinematographer has to design and write a story, starting at the beginning, through the evolution to the end. That’s why I consider my profession is as a writer of light. —Vittorio Storaro

Vittorio Storaro recalls the photographic challenges he confronted during the tumultuous production of Francis Ford Coppola’s hallucinatory Vietnam War epic Apocalypse Now. Interview by Stephen Burum, ASC and Stephen Pizzello.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

Writing with Light: Vittorio Storaro (1992) — a marvelous documentary about legendary cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, one of history’s ten most influential cinematographers (Apocalypse Now, The Last Emperor, Reds, Il Confimista, 1900). Vittorio Storaro talks about his work, along with collaborators like Warren Beatty and Bernardo Bertolucci and peers like Nestor Almendros. On-set footage from Dick Tracy and The Sheltering Sky. Storaro explains his zany theories about light and colour, and gives a potted history of lighting in the cinema.

A cinematographer has to design and write a story, starting at the beginning, through the evolution to the end. That’s why I consider my profession is as a writer of light. —Vittorio Storaro

Vittorio Storaro recalls the photographic challenges he confronted during the tumultuous production of Francis Ford Coppola’s hallucinatory Vietnam War epic Apocalypse Now. Interview by Stephen Burum, ASC and Stephen Pizzello.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

(via juliakip)

penamerican:

"If there were a better, clearer, shorter way of saying what the fiction says, then why not scrap the fiction?" - J.M. Coetzee

penamerican:

"If there were a better, clearer, shorter way of saying what the fiction says, then why not scrap the fiction?" - J.M. Coetzee

slaughterhouse90210:

“In the end, it wasn’t death that surprised her but the stubbornness of life.”― Jeffrey Eugenides, The Virgin Suicides

slaughterhouse90210:

“In the end, it wasn’t death that surprised her but the stubbornness of life.”
― Jeffrey Eugenides,
The Virgin Suicides

Race is constant. You’re tired of hearing about it? Imagine how fucking exhausting it is living it.

—Jon Stewart addressing Fox News’s (white) correspondents whining about hearing about race issues in the United States (via recklessinsanity)

(Source: wryan, via jeffthrowdown)

Do you ever read your scripts and think to yourself, “That still happens, yeah, that still happens in modern America?” The plight of women, while it has improved, has not advanced to the point where these are the types of mistreatments that are so unusual that they are extinct. 

(Source: cchristina-hendricks, via thoughshesfeminine)