"So we beat on, boats against the current"

M. here - sorta like Kafka's K., but hopefully a little funnier. I'm currently working on an M.A. in Literature, continuing my work in academia as a scholar on Philip Roth, Woody Allen, Ingmar Bergman and Mad Men.
newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.
Photograph by Ruven Afanador

newyorker:

From Larissa MacFarquhar’s 2003 Profile of Quentin Tarantino:

“For every monologue he writes about an old movie or TV show, he writes one about European hamburgers or tipping waitresses or eating pork. … The love of minutiae, like the love of pop culture, is a form of nostalgia—a junk-food version of Proust’s madeleine. But, unlike madeleine-nostalgia—nostalgia for a lost world, an unrecoverable childhood—minutiae-nostalgia is nostalgia for a world that still exists, for a life you’re still living.”

Take a look at more classic New Yorker stories about filmmakers.

Photograph by Ruven Afanador

(Source: newyorker.com)

craftylindsey:

lucifers-kittykat:

This is Susan Robinson, one of the last people in the country who can preform late term abortions after the murder of Dr. George Tiller. This is from an awesome documentary called After Tiller, about the last 4 late-term abortion practitioners in the country. It’s a great watch and available on Netflix, would strongly recommend. 

warrior woman

(Source: throwherinthewater, via innaudiblemelodiess)

#puffpuff won’t let me style my own hair. I guess his logic is that if I get to brush him, he should be able to do the same. Still, at least I don’t use my claws… #cats #hairstyle #catselfie

#puffpuff won’t let me style my own hair. I guess his logic is that if I get to brush him, he should be able to do the same. Still, at least I don’t use my claws… #cats #hairstyle #catselfie

Just another post-shower cat shoulder #selfie with #puffpuff

Just another post-shower cat shoulder #selfie with #puffpuff

You guys… #GoneGirl finally.

You guys… #GoneGirl finally.

One of the problems with the idea that America needs a “Conversation On Race” is that it presumes that “America” has something intelligent to say about race. All you need do is look at how American history is taught in this country to realize that that is basically impossible.

I have had conversations with very well-educated people who, with a straight face, have told me that there are Black Confederates. If you ask a very well educated person how the GI Bill exacerbated the wealth gap, or how New Deal housing policy helped create the ghetto they very likely will not know. And they do not know, not because they are ignorant, stupid, or immoral, they do not know because they are part of country that has decided that “not knowing” is in its interest. There’s no room for any sort of serious conversation when the basic facts of history are not accessible. It would be like me demanding a conversation on Vichy France—en Français.

—The always on point Ta-Nehisi Coates. The quote is taken from a blogpost which points out how some of the problems found within the Brad Paisley/L.L. Cool J song, “Accidental Racist,” can be traced back to our lackluster history education. (via thirdgenerationexile)

(Source: The Atlantic, via thoughshesfeminine)

criterioncast:


Available today from the Criterion Collection: John Ford’s My Darling Clementine

“Affecting and stunningly photographed, My Darling Clementine is a story of the triumph of civilization over the Wild West from American cinema’s consummate mythmaker.”

Supplements include:
New 4K digital restoration of the theatrical release version of the film, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
High-definition presentation of the 103-minute prerelease version of the film
New audio commentary featuring John Ford biographer Joseph McBride
New interview with western historian Andrew C. Isenberg about the real Wyatt Earp
Comparison of the two versions by film preservationist Robert Gitt
New video essay by Ford scholar Tag Gallagher
Bandit’s Wager, a 1916 silent western short costarring Ford and directed by his brother, Francis Ford, featuring new music composed and performed by Donald Sosin
NBC television reports from 1963 and 1975 about the history of Tombstone and Monument Valley
Lux Radio Theatre adaptation from 1947 starring Henry Fonda and Cathy Downs
Trailer
PLUS: An essay by critic David Jenkins
Order on Amazon

criterioncast:

Available today from the Criterion Collection: John Ford’s My Darling Clementine

“Affecting and stunningly photographed, My Darling Clementine is a story of the triumph of civilization over the Wild West from American cinema’s consummate mythmaker.”

Supplements include:

  • New 4K digital restoration of the theatrical release version of the film, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • High-definition presentation of the 103-minute prerelease version of the film
  • New audio commentary featuring John Ford biographer Joseph McBride
  • New interview with western historian Andrew C. Isenberg about the real Wyatt Earp
  • Comparison of the two versions by film preservationist Robert Gitt
  • New video essay by Ford scholar Tag Gallagher
  • Bandit’s Wager, a 1916 silent western short costarring Ford and directed by his brother, Francis Ford, featuring new music composed and performed by Donald Sosin
  • NBC television reports from 1963 and 1975 about the history of Tombstone and Monument Valley
  • Lux Radio Theatre adaptation from 1947 starring Henry Fonda and Cathy Downs
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: An essay by critic David Jenkins

Order on Amazon

Anonymous asked: The Secret History, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, Murakami,

nypl:

This week’s readers advisory request comes to us in the form of two books and an author our reader has enjoyed in the past: The Secret HistoryJonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell, and Haruki Murakami

Here is what our staff recommended for this reader. If you want a reading recommendation from the NYPL, ask us on Tumblr.

The Crying of Lot 49 Cover

I might say the reader likes language and story, with character-based interest too, and with some psychological suspense or even unreliability in the mix. Or, just, generally meaty books that grab you with inner ruminating intrigue. I’d recommend trying The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon for some intrigue and a picture of someone confronting questions of hidden reality from a big-name writer. I’d also recommend The Book of Laughter and Forgetting by Milan Kundera, for language, fantastical yet deep, pondering, and relatable examinations of reality, and characterizations. —Jill Rothstein, Andrew Heiskell Library

I’m guessing this reader likes college settings with lots of intrigue and suspense, in addition to character building and language style. I think some of the other well-known authors of Japanese literature might fit the bill, or titles set at universities, especially novels with gothic or mysterious overtones, and bildungsroman. Try Ryu Murakami’s Almost Transparent Blue and 69, Kenzaburo Oe’s The Changeling, Banana Yoshimoto’s The Lake,Campus novels and more campus novels—Jenny Baum, Jefferson Market

Read more here